Мои Конспекты
Главная | Обратная связь

...

Автомобили
Астрономия
Биология
География
Дом и сад
Другие языки
Другое
Информатика
История
Культура
Литература
Логика
Математика
Медицина
Металлургия
Механика
Образование
Охрана труда
Педагогика
Политика
Право
Психология
Религия
Риторика
Социология
Спорт
Строительство
Технология
Туризм
Физика
Философия
Финансы
Химия
Черчение
Экология
Экономика
Электроника

SCENE 2





Помощь в ✍️ написании работы
Поможем с курсовой, контрольной, дипломной, рефератом, отчетом по практике, научно-исследовательской и любой другой работой

The Forest. A forest. It is night. The moon is shining. Old trees of various kinds, notably an OAK, a BEECH, an ELM, a POPLAR, a FIR-TREE, a CYPRESS, a LIME-TREE, a CHESTNUT-TREE, etc. Enter the CAT.

THE CAT

(bowing to the trees in turn) To all the trees here present, greeting!

THE TREES

(murmuring in their leaves) Greeting!

THE CAT

This is a great day, a day of days!... Our enemy is coming to set free your energies and to deliver himself into your hands.... It is Tyltyl, the son of the wood-cutter, who has done you so much harm.... He is seeking the Blue Bird, whom you have kept hidden from Man since the beginning of the world and who alone knows our secret. (A murmuring in the leaves)

What do you say?... Ah, it's the Poplar!... Yes, he possesses a diamond which has the virtue of setting free our spirits for a moment; he can compel us to hand over the Blue Bird and thenceforth we shall be definitely at Man's mercy. (A murmuring in the leaves) Who is speaking?... Ah, the Oak!... How are you? (A murmuring in the leaves of the OAK) Still got your cold?... Does the Liquorice no longer look after you?... Can't you throw off your rheumatism?... Believe me, that's because of the moss; you put too much of it on your feet.... Is the Blue Bird still with you? (A murmuring in the leaves of the OAK) I beg your pardon?... Yes, there is no room for hesitation; we must take the opportunity; he must he done away with. (A murmuring in the leaves) I didn't quite catch.... Oh, yes, he is with his little sister; she must die, too. (A murmuring in the leaves) Yes, they have the Dog with them; there is no keeping him

away. (A murmuring in the leaves) What did you say?... Bribe him?... Impossible.... I have tried everything. (A murmuring in the leaves) Ah, is that you, Fir-Tree?... Yes, get four planks ready.... Yes, there are Fire, Sugar, Water and Bread besides.... They are all with us, except Bread, who is rather doubtful.... Light alone is on Man's side; but she won't come.... I made the children believe that they ought to steal away while she was asleep.... There never was such an opportunity. (A murmuring in the leaves) Ah, that's the Beech's voice!... Yes, you are right; we must inform the animals.... Has the Rabbit got his drum?... Is he with you?... Good, let him beat the troop at once.... Here they are! The roll of the Rabbit's drum is heard, diminishing

in the distance. Enter TYLTYL, MYTYL and the DOG.

TYLTYL

Is this the place?

THE CAT

(obsequiously, eagerly, mealy-mouthed, rushing to meet the CHILDREN)

Ah, there you are, my little master!... How well you look and how pretty, this evening!... I went before you to announce your arrival.... All is going well. We shall have the Blue Bird tonight, I am sure.... I have just sent the Rabbit to beat the troop in order to convoke the principal animals of the country.... You can hear them already among the foliage.... Listen!... They are a little shy and dare not come near.

(The sounds are heard of different animals, such as cows, pigs, horses, donkeys, etc. The CAT, aside, to TYLTYL, taking him apart)

But why have you brought the Dog?... I have told you he is on the worst terms with everybody, even the trees.... I fear that his odious presence will spoil everything.

TYLTYL

I could not get rid of him. (To the DOG, threatening him) Go away, you ugly thing!

THE DOG

Who?... I?... Why?... What have I done?

TYLTYL

I tell you, go away!... We don't want you here and there's an end of it.... You're a nuisance, there!

THE DOG

I sha'n't say a word.... I shall follow you at a distance.... They sha'n't see me.... Shall I beg?

THE CAT

(aside, to TYLTYL) Do you allow this disobedience?... Hit him on the nose withyour stick; he is really unbearable!

TYLTYL

(beating the DOG) There, that will teach you to be more obedient!

THE DOG

(yelling) Ow! Ow! Ow!

TYLTYL

What do you say?

THE DOG

I must kiss you now you've beaten me! (He covers TYLTYL with violent kisses and embraces)

TYLTYL

Come.... That will do.... That's enough... Go away!

MYTYL

No, no; I want him to stay.... I am afraid of everything when he is not there.

THE DOG

(leaping up and almost upsetting MYTYL, whom he overwhelms with hurried and enthusiastic kisses) Oh, the dear little girl!... How beautiful she is!... Howgood she is!... How beautiful she is, how sweet she is!... Imust kiss her!... Once more, once more, once more!

THE CAT

What an idiot!... Well, we shall see!... Let us lose no time.... Turn the diamond.

TYLTYL

Where shall I stand?

THE CAT

In this moonbeam; you will see better.... There, turn it gently!

TYLTYL turns the Diamond. A long-drawn-out rustling shakes the leaves and branches. The oldest and most stately trunks open to make way for the soul which each of them contains. The appearance of these souls differs according to the appearance and the character of the trees which they represent. The soul of the ELM, for instance, is a sort of pursy, pot-bellied, crabbed gnome; the LIME-TREE is placid, familiar and jovial; the BEECH, elegant and agile; the BIRCH, white, reserved and restless; the WILLOW, stunted, dishevelled and plaintive; the FIRTREE,

tall, lean and taciturn; the CYPRESS, tragic; the CHESTNUT-TREE, pretentious and rather

dandified; the POPLAR, sprightly, cumbersome, talkative. Some emerge slowly from their trunks, torpidly stretching themselves, as though they had been imprisoned or asleep for ages; others leap out actively, eagerly; and all come and stand in a circle round the two CHILDREN, while keeping as near as they can to the tree in which they were born.

THE POPLAR

(running up first and screaming, at the top of his voice) Men?... Little men!... We shall be able to talk to them!...We've done with silence!... Done with it!... Where do theycome from?... Who are they?... What are they? (To the LIME-TREE, who comes forward quietly smoking his pipe)

Do you know them, Daddy Lime-Tree?

THE LIME-TREE

I do not remember ever having seen them.

THE POPLAR

Oh, yes, you must have!... You know all the men; you're always hanging about their houses.

THE LIME-TREE

(examining the CHILDREN) No, I assure you.... I don't know them.... They are too young

still.... I only know the lovers who come to see me by moonlight and the topers who drink their beer under my branches.

THE CHESTNUT-TREE

(affectedly adjusting his eyeglass) Who are these?... Are they poor people from the country?

THE POPLAR

Oh, as for you, Mr. Chestnut-Tree, ever since you have refused to show yourself except in the streets of the big town...

THE WILLOW

(hobbling along in a pair of wooden shoes) Oh dear, oh dear!... They have come to cut off my head andarms again for fagots!

THE POPLAR

Silence!... Here is the Oak leaving his palace!... He looks far from well this evening.... Don't you think he is growing very old?... What can his age be?... The Fir-Tree says he is four thousand; but I am sure that he exaggerates.... Listen; he will tell us all about it.

The OAK comes slowly forward. He is fabulously old, crowned with mistletoe and clad in a long green gown edged with moss and lichen. He is blind; his white beard streams in the wind. He leans with one hand on a knotty stick and with the other on a young OAKLING, who serves as his guide. The Blue Bird is perched on his shoulder. At his approach, the other trees draw themselves up in a row and bow respectfully.

TYLTYL

He has the Blue Bird!... Quick! Quick!... Here!... Give it to me!

THE POPLAR (cont'd)

THE TREES

Silence!

THE CAT

(to TYLTYL) Take off your hat, it's the Oak!

THE OAK

(to TYLTYL) Who are you?

TYLTYL

I am Tyltyl, sir.... When can I have the Blue Bird?

THE OAK

Tyltyl, the wood-cutter's son?

TYLTYL

Yes, sir.

THE OAK

Your father has done us much harm.... In my family alone, he has put to death six hundred of my sons, four hundred and seventy-five uncles and aunts, twelve hundred cousins of both sexes, three hundred and eighty daughters-in-law, and twelve thousand great-grandsons!

TYLTYL

I know nothing about it, sir.... He did not do it on purpose.

THE OAK

What have you come here for; and why have you made our souls leave their abodes?

TYLTYL

I beg your pardon, sir, for disturbing you.... The Cat said that you would tell us where the Blue Bird was.

THE OAK

Yes, I know that you are looking for the Blue Bird, that is to say, the great secret of things and of happiness, so that may make our servitude still harder.

TYLTYL

Oh, no, sir; it is for the Fairy Berylune's little girl, who is very ill.

THE OAK

(laying silence upon him with a gesture) Enough!... I do not hear the Animals.... Where are they?...All this concerns them as much as us.... We, the Trees, mustnot assume the responsibility alone for the grave measuresthat have become necessary.... On the day when Man hears thatwe have done what we are about to do, there will be terriblereprisals.... It is right, therefore, that our agreementshould be unanimous, so that our silence may be the same.

THE FIR-TREE

(looking over the top of the other trees) The Animals are coming.... They are following the Rabbit....Here are the souls of the Horse, the Bull, the Ox, the Cow,the Wolf, the Sheep, the Pig, the Cock, the Goat, the Ass,and the Bear.

Enter the souls of the ANIMALS, who, as the FIRTREE utters their names, come forward and sit down among the trees, with the exception of the soul of the GOAT, who roams to and fro, and of the PIG, who snuffles among the roots.

THE OAK

Are all here present?

THE RABBIT

The Hen could not leave her eggs, the Hare is out on a run, the Stag has a pain in his horns, the Fox is ill –– here is the doctor's certificate –– the Goose did not understand and the Turkey flew into a passion.

THE OAK

These abstentions are most regrettable.... However, we have a quorum.... You know, my brothers, the nature of our business. The child you see before you, thanks to a talisman stolen

from the powers of Earth, is able to take possession of the Blue Bird and thus to snatch from us the secret which we have kept since the origin of life.... Now we know enough of Man to entertain no doubt as to the fate which he reserves for us once he is in possession of this secret. That is why it seems to me that any hesitation would be both foolish and criminal.... It is a serious moment; the child must be done away with before it is too late.

TYLTYL

What is he saying?

THE DOG

(prowling round the OAK and showing his fangs) Do you see my teeth, you old cripple?

THE BEECH

(indignantly) He is insulting the Oak!

THE OAK

Is that the Dog?... Drive him out! We must suffer no traitors among us!

THE OAK (cont'd)

THE CAT

(aside, to TYLTYL) Send the Dog away.... It's a misunderstanding.... Leave it tome; I will arrange things.... But send him away as quick asyou can.

TYLTYL

(to the DOG) Will you be off!

THE DOG

Do let me worry the gouty old beggar's moss slippers!... It will be such a joke!

TYLTYL

Hold your tongue!... And be off with you!... Be off, you ugly brute!

THE DOG

All right, all right, I'm going.... I'll come back when you want me.

THE CAT

(aside, to TYLTYL) It would be a good thing to chain him up, or he will commit some folly; the Trees will be angry and all will end badly.

TYLTYL

What can I do?... I have lost his leash.

THE CAT

Here's the Ivy just coming along with strong bonds.

THE DOG

(growling) I'll come back, I'll come back!... Ugh!... Goutytoes!Timbertoes!... Pack of old stunted growths, pack of oldroots!... It's the Cat who's at the bottom of all this!...I'll be even with him!... What have you been whisperingabout, you sneak, you tiger, you Judas!... Wow, wow, wow!

THE CAT

You see, he insults everybody.

TYLTYL

Yes, he is unbearable and one can't hear one's self speak.... Mr. Ivy, will you chain him up, please?

THE IVY

(timorously going up to the DOG) Won't he bite?

THE DOG

(growling) On the contrary, on the contrary!... He's going to kissyou!... Just wait and see!... Come along, come along, you oldball of twine, you!

TYLTYL

(threatening him with his stick) Tylo!

THE DOG

(cringing at Tyltyl's feet and wagging his tail) What am I to do, my little god?

TYLTYL

Lie down flat!... Obey the Ivy.... Let him bind you, or ––

THE DOG

(growling between his teeth, while the IVY binds him) Ball of twine!... Hunk of yarn!... Hangman's rope!... Calves'leash!... Look, my little god!... He's cutting my paws!...He's choking me!

TYLTYL

I don't care!... It's your own fault.... Hold your tongue; be quiet; you're unbearable!

THE DOG

You're wrong, for all that.... They mean mischief.... Take care, my little god!... He's closing my mouth!... I can't speak!

THE IVY

(who has tied up the DOG like a parcel) Where shall we put him?... I've muzzled him finely.... Hecan't utter a word.

THE OAK

Fasten him tight down there, behind my trunk, to my big root.... We will decide later what had best be done with him. The IVY and the POPLAR carry the DOG behind the OAK'S trunk.

THE OAK

Is that done?... Well, now that we are rid of this inconvenient witness, of this renegade, let us deliberate in accordance with justice and truth.... I will not conceal from you the deep and painful nature of my emotion.... This is the first time that it is given to us to judge Man and make him feel our power.... I do not think that, after the harm which he has done us, after the monstrous injustice which we have suffered, there can remain the least doubt as to the sentence that awaits him.

ALL THE TREES AND ANIMALS

No! No! No!... No doubt at all!... Hanging!... Death!... The injustice has been too great!... The abuse too wicked!... It has lasted too long!... Crush him!... Eat him!... At once!... Here and now!

TYLTYL

(to the CAT) What is the matter with them?... Are they displeased?

THE CAT

Don't be alarmed.... They are a little annoyed because Spring is late.... Leave it to me; I will settle it all.

THE OAK

This unanimity was inevitable.... We must now decide, in order to avoid reprisals, which form of execution will be the most practical, the easiest, the quickest and the safest, which will leave the fewest accusing traces when Man finds the little bodies in the forest.

TYLTYL

What is all this about?... What is he driving at?... I am getting tired of this.... He has got the Blue Bird; let him hand it over.

THE BULL

(coming forward) The most practical and the surest way is a good butt with thehorns in the pit of the stomach.... Shall I go at him?

THE OAK

Who speaks?

THE CAT

It's the Bull.

THE COW

It would be better to keep quiet.... I won't meddle with it.... I have all the grass to browse in the field which you can see down there in the blue light of the moon.... I have quite enough to do.

THE OX

I also.... However, I agree to everything beforehand.

THE BEECH

I can offer my highest branch to hang them on.

THE IVY

And I the slip-knot.

THE OAK (cont'd)

THE FIR-TREE

And I the four planks for their little coffin.

THE CYPRESS

And I a perpetual grant of a tomb.

THE WILLOW

The simplest way would be to drown them in one of my rivers.... I will take charge of that.

THE LIME-TREE

(in a conciliatory tone) Come, come.... Is it really necessary to go to suchextremities?... They are very young.... We could quite simplyprevent them from doing any harm by keeping them prisoners inan enclosure which I will undertake to form by plantingmyself all around.

THE OAK

Who speaks?... I seem to recognise the honeyed accents of the Lime-Tree.

THE FIR-TREE

Yes, it's he.

THE OAK

So there is a renegade among us, as among the Animals?... Hitherto we have only had to deplore the disloyalty of the Fruit-Trees; but they are not real trees.

THE PIG

(rolling his small eyes gluttonously) I think we should first eat the little girl.... She ought to

be very tender.

TYLTYL

What's he saying?... Just wait a bit, you

THE CAT

I don't know what is the matter with them; but things are beginning to look badly.

THE OAK

Silence!... What we have to decide is which of us shall have the honour of striking the first blow, who shall ward off from our tops the greatest danger that has threatened us since the birth of Man.

THE FIR-TREE

That honour falls to you, our king and our patriarch.

THE OAK

Is that the Fir-Tree speaking?... Alas, I am too old!... I am blind and infirm and my numbed arms no longer obey me.... No, to you, brother, ever green, ever upright, to you, who have witnessed the birth of most of these trees, to you be the glory, in default of myself, of the noble act of our

deliverance.

THE FIR-TREE

I thank you, venerable father.... But as I shall, in any case, have the honour of burying the two victims, I should be afraid of arousing the just jealousy of my colleagues; and I think that, next to ourselves, the oldest and the worthiest and the one that owns the best club is the Beech.

THE BEECH

You know I am worm-eaten and my club is no longer to be relied upon.... But the Elm and the Cypress have powerful weapons.

THE ELM

I should be only too pleased; but I can hardly stand upright.... A mole twisted my great toe last night.

THE CYPRESS

As for me, I am ready.... But, like my brother, the Fir-Tree, I shall have, if not the privilege of burying them, at least the advantage of weeping over their tomb.... It would be an unlawful plurality of offices.... Ask the Poplar.

THE POPLAR

Me?... Are you serious?... Why, my wood is more tender than the flesh of a child!... And, besides, I don't know what's the matter with me.... I am shivering with fever.... Just look at my leaves.... I must have caught cold at sunrise this morning.

THE OAK

(bursting out with indignation) You are afraid of Man!... Even those unprotected and unarmed

little children inspire you with the mysterious terror which has always made us the slaves that we are!... Enough of this! Things being as they are and the opportunity unequalled, I shall go forth alone, old, crippled, trembling, blind as I am, against the hereditary enemy!... Where is he?

(Groping with his stick, he moves towards TYLTYL)

TYLTYL

(taking his knife from his pocket) Is it me he's after, that old one, with his big stick?

ALL THE TREES

(uttering a cry of alarm at the sight of the knife, they step in between and hold back the OAK)

The knife!... Take care!... The knife!

THE OAK

(struggling) Let me be!... What does it matter?... The knife or theaxe!... Who's holding me back?... What! Are you all here?...What! You all want to. (Flinging down his stick) Well, so be it!... Shame upon us!... Let the Animals deliver us!

THE BULL

That's right!... I'll see to it!... And with one blow of the horns!

THE OX AND THE COW

(holding him back by the tail) What are you doing?... Don't be a fool!... It's a badbusiness!... It will end badly.... It is we who will pay forit.... Do let be.... It's the wild animals' business.

THE BULL

No, no!... It's my business!... Wait and see!... Look here, hold me back or there will be an accident!

TYLTYL

(to MYTYL,who is uttering piercing screams) Don't be afraid!... Stand behind me.... I have my knife.

THE COCK

He has plenty of pluck, the little chap!

TYLTYL

So you've made up your minds, it's me you're going for?

THE ASS

Why, of course, my little man; you've taken long enough to see it!

THE PIG

You can say your prayers; your last hour has come.... But don't hide the little girl.... I want to feast my eyes on her.... I'm going to eat her first?

TYLTYL

What have I done to you?

THE SHEEP

Nothing at all, my little man.... Eaten my little brother, my two sisters, my three uncles, my aunt, my grandpapa and my grandmamma.... Wait, wait, when you're down, you shall see that I have teeth also.

THE ASS

And I hoofs!

THE HORSE

(haughtily pawing the ground) You shall see what you shall see!... Would you rather that I

tore you with my teeth or knocked you down with a kick? (He moves ostentatiously towards TYLTYL, who faces him and raises his knife. Suddenly the HORSE, seized with panic, turns and rushes away) Ah, no!... That's not fair!... That's against the rules!... He's defending himself!

THE COCK

(unable to hide his admiration) I don't care, the little chap's full of grit!

THE PIG

(to the BEAR and the WOLF) Let us all rush on them together.... I will support you fromthe rear.... We will throw them down and share the littlegirl when she is on the ground.

THE WOLF

Divert their attention in front.... I am going to make a turning movement. (He goes round TYLTYL, whom he attacks from behind and half overthrows)

TYLTYL

You brute! (He raises himself on one knee brandishing his knife and doing his best to cover his little sister, who utters yells of distress. Seeing him half overturned, all the ANIMALS and TREES come up and try to hit him. TYLTYL calls distractedly for assistance) Help! Help!... Tylo! Tylo!... Where is the Cat?... Tylo!... Tylette! Tylette!... Come! Come!

THE CAT

(hypocritically, holding aloof) I can't come.... I have sprained my paw

TYLTYL

(warding off the blows and defending himself as best he can) Help!... Tylo! Tylo!... I can't hold out!... There are toomany of them!... The Bear! The Pig! The Donkey! The Ass! TheFir-Tree! The Beech!... Tylo! Tylo! Tylo!

THE SHEEP (cont'd)

Dragging his broken bonds after him, the DOG leaps from behind the trunk of the OAK and, elbowing his way through TREES and ANIMALS, flings himself before TYLTYL, whom he defends furiously.

THE DOG

(distributing great bites) Here! Here, my little god!... Don't be afraid! Have atthem!... I know how to use my teeth!... Here, there's one foryou, Bear, in your fat hams!... Now then, who wants somemore?... Here, that's for the Pig and that's for the Horseand that's for the Bull's tail!... There, I've torn theBeech's trousers and the Oak's petticoat!... The Fir-Tree'smaking tracks!... Whew, it's warm work!

TYLTYL

(overcome) I'm done for!... The Cypress has caught me a great blow onthe head.

THE DOG

Ow!... That's the Willow!... He's broken my paw!

TYLTYL

They're coming back, they're charging down upon us, all together!... This time, it's the Wolf!

THE DOG

Wait till I give him one for himself!

THE WOLF

Fool!... Our brother!... His father drowned your seven puppies!

THE DOG

Quite right!... And a good thing too!... It was because they looked like you!

ALL THE TREES AND ANIMALS

Renegade!... Idiot!... Traitor!... Felon!... Simpleton!... Judas!... Leave him!... He's a dead man!... Come over to us!

THE DOG

(drunk with ardour and devotion) Never! Never!... I alone against all of you!... Never!Never!... True to the gods, to the best, to the greatest? (To TYLTYL) Take care, here's the Bear!... Beware of the Bull!... I'lljump at his throat.... Ow!... That's a kick.... The Ass hasbroken two of my teeth.

TYLTYL

I'm done for, Tylo!... Ah!... That was a blow from the Elm.... Look, my hand's bleeding.... That's the Wolf or the Pig.

THE DOG

Wait, my little god.... Let me kiss you.... There, a good lick.... That will do you good.... Keep behind me.... They dare not come again.... Yes, though.... Here they are coming back!... This time, it's serious!... We must stand firm!

TYLTYL

(dropping to the ground) No, I can hold out no longer!

THE DOG

(listening) They are coming!... I hear them, I scent them!

TYLTYL

Where?... Who?

THE DOG

There! There!... It's Light!... She has found us!... Saved, my little king!... Kiss me!... We are saved!... Look!... They're alarmed!... They're retreating!... They're afraid!

TYLTYL

Light!... Light!... Come quick!... Hurry!... They have

rebelled!... They are all against us! Enter LIGHT. As she comes forward, the dawn rises

over the forest, which becomes light.

LIGHT

What is it?... What has happened?... But, my poor boy, didn't you know?... Turn the diamond!... They will return into silence and obscurity; and you will no longer perceive their hidden feelings.

TYLTYL turns the diamond. Immediately, the souls of all the TREES rush back into the trunks, which close again. The souls of the ANIMALS also disappear; and a peaceful COW and SHEEP, etc., are seen browsing in the distance. The Forest becomes harmless once more. TYLTYL looks around him in amazement.

TYLTYL

Where are they?... What was the matter with them?... Were they mad?

LIGHT

No, they are always like that; but we do not know it because we do not see it.... I told you so before; it is dangerous to wake them when I am not there.

TYLTYL

(wiping his knife) Well, but for the Dog and if I had not had my knife!... Iwould never have believed that they were so wicked!

LIGHT

You see that Man is all alone against all in this world.

THE DOG

Are you very badly hurt, my little god?

TYLTYL

Nothing serious.... As for Mytyl, they have not touched her.... But you, my dear Tylo?... Your mouth is all over blood and your paw is broken!

THE DOG

It is not worth speaking of.... It won't show tomorrow.... But it was a tough fight!

THE CAT

(appearing from behind a thicket, limping) I should think so!... The Ox caught me a blow with his hornsin the stomach.... You can't see the marks, but it's verypainful.... And the Oak broke my paw.

THE DOG

I should like to know which one.

MYTYL

(stroking the CAT) My poor Tylette, did he really?... Where were you?... I didnot see you.

THE CAT

(hypocritically) Mummy dear, I was wounded at the first, while attacking thathorrid Pig, who wanted to eat you.... And then the Oak gaveme a great blow which struck me senseless.

THE DOG

(to the CAT, between his teeth) As for you, I want a word with you presently.... It will

keep!

THE CAT

(plaintively, to MYTYL) Mummy dear, he's insulting me.... He wants to hurt me.

MYTYL

(to the DOG) Leave him alone, will you, you ugly beast?

They all go out.

Доверь свою работу ✍️ кандидату наук!
Поможем с курсовой, контрольной, дипломной, рефератом, отчетом по практике, научно-исследовательской и любой другой работой



Поиск по сайту:







©2015-2020 mykonspekts.ru Все права принадлежат авторам размещенных материалов.