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Figure 5.23 continues.





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T 0 U R 1 S M


Figure 5.23(continued)

A referendum on this issue is out of the question; there have been many public meet­ings about it. Kangaroo Island has a tourism-development policy, and before this was finalised there were also public meetings. The members of the public were able to express what they wanted for tourism on the island through those meetings. The plans for the Tandanya development have been on display, and the chance for public comment has generally been extensive.

Figure 5.23 Comment (Adapted from the original)

From Kangaroo Island's local botanist...

The proposed Tandanya development will be in the middle of tall trees - Sugar Gums. In the area there are 22 plants, 11 of which are or­chids, and of these there are five that the South Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service lists as protected plant species — they grow nowhere else in the world. They are plants of a particular geographical location. This makes them very interesting and special.

The clearing of the land in order to under­take development, such as the laying of pipes and digging of trenches for sewerage, the con­struction of buildings, plus the clearing itself, which the CFS insists must take place up to 20 metres around all buildings, means that the area will be left with one or two clumps of big trees but no small trees. There will also be a problem of soil compaction from the building operations, which will affect the remaining plants.

Figure 5.24 Comment (Adapted from the original)

From a member of Kangaroo Island's .Western Community Club

There's no point In farming sheep at the moment, so people are trying to supplement their income with anything. We just feel strongly that without this development, Kangaroo Island is going to die. It's hot what will happen to KI with the development; it's what will happen without it.

Figure 5.25 Comment (Adapted from the original)


From the Department of Environment and Planning's planning project officer...

The government would prefer to see the Tandanya proposal go ahead rather than the proposal put by the previous owners of the land, Paradise Developments, which encompassed a motel and caravan-and-camping facilities for more than 600 people, a swimming pool and restaurants.

The Tandanya proposal is deliberately dif­ferent. It has been conceived as a 'back-to-na­ture experience' comprising cabins for couples, families and school groups, set among existing trees, plus reception and administration build-ingSj conference rooms, a bar and restaurant, and staff quarters. Rainwater will be captured, and stores and effluent will be treated on site. It will be built in stages, with an initial target of 100 beds.

■ ■

Figure 5.26 Comment (Adapted from the original)

From the president of the Kangaroo Island Tourist Association...

Existing communities should be protected from
the vacuum effect of new developments of the
magnitude of Tandanya. Tourism should not be
at the cost of the local community. I do fear for
the bigger tourism operators on the island who have invested a lot of money. We could just lose
them.

The only existing operators that would benefit from Tandanya are the ferry and air services - the two groups that don't live on KI.

I am worried that the resort could alter the low-key rural charm of Kangaroo Island.

Americans and Europeans are saying to us, 'For God's sake, don't change it.' If they develop a resort here, they [the visitors] might as well go somewhere else.

Figure 5.27 Comment (Adapted from the original)

From the president of the South Australian National Parks Association

We seem to be unable to make planning deci­sions and stick with them. The moment money becomes available, it is sufficient to overthrow sensible and careful plans for the region.

Figure 5.28 Comment



INVESTIGATING AN ISSUE


From a Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union unionist.

We have written a letter to the state government asking them to stick to their existing policy and to have an Environmental Impact Study [Statement] completed for the area. We also want the government to adhere to the Conservation Act as it applies to threatened species. If they don't undertake to do these things, there will be no building by our unionists within the de­velopment area.

Figure 5.29 Comment (Adapted from the original)

From three spokespersons for a Kangaroo Island environment group...

First person, commenting on the proposed state government changes to the Conservation Act:

Our organisation is concerned because we say, ‘Why have an Act, when some development pro­posal finds difficulty getting around it, so you change it; that's pointless.

We are fighting a rear-guard action, because at every stage that we have called for an Environmental Impact Study [Statement] it has been completely ignored.

Second person

Development should stand on its own merits,

not be manipulated through government departments. Tourism SA has jumped on the band­wagon. It's had an increase in budget, and it's empire building. Tourism SA's annual budget was increased 10 per cent for 1991-92, to $17.4 million. A $200,000 project to improve Kanga­roo Island's South. Coast Road was one of only two new tourism projects funded by the state government in 1992.

Third, person:

The site was sold at ah exorbitant profit for Paradise, and they [System One ] thought they were buying a plan with approval: That's why Tourism SA are fighting desperately to get it through.

The developers came here and bought this pup. If Tandanya has 220 beds and is occupied 50 per cent for the year, that is adding more than 30,000 visitors a year to the island. We have 90,000 visitors now and can't cope with them. In 1988, I was at Seal Bay filming the seals. We could have touched the seals; now barriers are up to protect them from the huge number of tourists.

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