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Selecting a Cutting Draft





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There are various reasons to pick a particular cutting draft. One might choose the draft that is most similar to tunics one has made in the past; one might choose it for reasons of authenticity, that is, one that is close in time and/or place to the persona for whom it is being made; or one might choose the style of tunic that one happens to know will look good on the recipient. Hopefully, sufficient information is provided in this section to make all three types of choices easier.

The following are the elements of a cutting draft which seem to be common to most, if not all, Viking Age body garments:

  • garment pieces are cut on the grain, that is, with warp threads running vertically on the piece, rather than on the bias. This is even true of underarm gussets and edging strips.
  • where sleeves are preserved, they taper toward the wrist.

The following are the elements of a cutting draft for which there are some choices represented in Viking Age tunics:

  • neckline: keyhole (definitely known from ninth- and tenth- century Sweden); rounded (definitely known from tenth- and eleventh-century Denmark); or "boat" style (definitely known from Migration Era Denmark). Keyhole necklines work well on undergarments because they can be clasped close to the neck, whereas rounded or boat necklines are less close-fitting and work better on overgarments.
  • side seams: slit, especially for men's smocks (definitely known from tenth- and eleventh-century Denmark); straight (definitely known from Migration Era Denmark); and straight with triangular gores inserted (definitely known from ninth- and tenth-century Sweden and tenth- and eleventh-century Denmark). Women's smocks and gowns almost always require gores. Men's riding coats require gores in order to achieve the fullness of skirt that is needed to ride a horse while wearing the coat; gores are optional on tunics and probably not needed on jackets. Men's smocks can have slit sides for greater freedom of movement.
  • sleeve/armhole: straight seam (definitely known from Migration Era Denmark); straight or tapered seam with square underarm gusset (definitely known from tenth-century Danelaw and eleventh-century Denmark); and rounded armhole with rounded sleeve (definitely known from tenth- and eleventh-century Denmark). Individuals with large chest measurements proportional to the rest of their anatomy--many women and fighters, especially--will find that tunics with straight seams don't fit as well because they don't provide any extra room across the chest.
  • shoulder construction: front and back panels cut with seams (definitely known from Migration Era, tenth-, and eleventh- century Denmark); front and back panels cut in one piece (definitely known from ninth- and tenth-century Sweden).
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